Kwanlin Dün First Nation

The Kwanlin Dün First Nation is based in the Whitehorse area and includes people of Southern Tutchone, Tagish, and Tlingit backgrounds. Miles Canyon was well known to generations of First Nations people as Kwanlin, which means “running water through canyon” in Southern Tutchone.
Kwanlin Dün First Nation

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