Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

The homeland of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations is located in the Southwest Yukon and Northwestern British Columbia. It is named after two of its historic settlements: Champagne located on the Dezadeash River and Aishihik, situated at the north-end of Aishihik Lake.
Champagne & Aishihik

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